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Canterbury Scene


 



Ecole de Canterbury or not ? Question cruciale à laquelle je me garderai bien de répondre à la légère...

Les arguments sont depuis longtemps connus. On débat dans des forums spécialisés, on échange entre spécialistes, l'Université s'en mêle, c'est un sujet qui fait réfléchir...


Sur Calyx, les avis sont partagés : Richard Sinclair, Didier Malherbe y vont de leur explication, Hugh Hopper est plus réservé et Robert Wyatt plutôt sacarstique...

HH

"People say, what is the Canterbury scene? I think you have to come to Canterbury and see it and hear it ! I think Kent has got a particular sound. We've sung it in our schools here, we were all at school in this sort of area. I was part of the Church of England choir : up to the age of sixteen I was singing tonalities that are very English. Over the last three or four hundred years, and even earlier than that, some of the tonalities go back. So they are here, and they are a mixture of European things too. The history is very much that. A very historical centre of activity is Canterbury for the last hundred years. So it's quite an important stepping stone of whatever this thousand years have covered. I think it's not to be mocked because it's a centre of communication here and it's a meeting point - many nations come here to visit the cathedral, so you get a very unique situation happening".

"A lot goes on here, it's quite cosmopolitan, Canterbury, to a degree... But that's because of the tourists, not from the people who actually live here : they are very conservative, not cosmopolitan at all, not particularly worldly, I don't think. The music happens outside, gets written here and taken out. This is the Canterbury scene for me. It doesn't really exist here, but it forms here. Musicians, friends join together and play music together, and then they head off around Europe and play their music and get noted for this type of sound"...


RW

"I couldn't tell you much about that... I don't remember any particular movement happening there. I was at school there, I got married there and I lived there for a while. The school I went to had nothing special, there wasn't any particular interest for art, and I grew bored because I wasn't really good at school... If there ever was a Canterbury scene, it was when the Wilde Flowers became Caravan : they were Canterbury people...".

"I didn't even know it meant me until interviewers started asking me about it. As I say, because I'd bussed in from outside to go to school there I didn't really consider myself a Canterbury person. I think it really means people like Hugh Hopper and Richard Sinclair, who are genuinely based in that area. I met them there and I'm eternally grateful that I met someone like Hugh who provided something I don't think anyone else could have provided. My mind doesn't dwell on it as a place though, if I recall a former fantasy world upon which I draw, it's Harlem in the Forties and not Canterbury in the Fifties...".



Sur Whatsrattlin (Yahoo Group) la problématique est clairement posée Does Canterbury exist ? et la polémique va bon train... :

All think the Ramones are not Canterbury, but maybe there was one Ramone who pushed Robert's wheelchair and maybe this is the reason to declare the Ramones as part of the CS, why should it be not ok - you must not accept it, but it's no reason to start a war!


Halte au feu !


Un émérite universitaire tente de s'interposer et rédige en 6 307 mots et 40 237 signes l'étude peut-être définitive sur l'Ecole de Canterbury :
Music, media and urban mythscapes: a study of the ‘Canterbury Sound’ !

L'Histoire jugera.